The deVeber Institute for Bioethics and Social Research conducts and disseminates research on topics connected to human life in its biological, social and ethical dimensions. These topics are selected for study depending on emerging medical, technological and social developments. In undertaking this work the Institute believes that a sense of the inherent value and dignity of human life and of the human person as an end and not a means is a foundational perspective to bring to bear on its work.

The Institute's research may be original or may consist of reviews of existing literature. In each case the Institute's work is to be of the highest academic quality, though accessible to the general public.

From the Director's Desk

Medical Ethics in an Age of Medically Assisted Dying and Reproductive Decisions

Medical Ethics in an Age of Medically Assisted Dying and Reproductive Decisions
 

You're invited to our second annual summer symposium which will take place on July 15th! This event will feature speakers including: Dr. William Gairdner, Dr. Kathy Pfaff, Dr. Shawn Whatley, and Prof. Ian Gentles. Our summer interns will also be presenting on the current research going on at the Institute.

Barbara Kay: Let’s not become Belgium when it comes to assisted suicide

On June 7th, 2016 Barbara Kay was featured in the National Post for her article “Barbara Kay: Let’s not become Belgium when it comes to assisted suicide”. This article brings forth many concerns for the safety of vulnerable Canadians. With evidence provided from our book “It’s Not That Simple: Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide Today”, she outlines why Canada will NOT be immune to the slippery-slope of assisted-death that is currently being experienced in Belgium and Netherlands. Safeguards are often ignored, patients are euthanized without their consent, and the risks go on.

 

It's Not That Simple in the News!

On June 1st, Andrew Coyne's article "Finger points of consent missing in assisted suicide bill" appeared in the National Post. In this article, Andrew comments on the pivotal role that consent and autonomy play in the debate on assisted suicide. He uses It's Not That Simple to support his argument that consent is not always present in countries with legalized euthanasia or assisted suicide and that the proposed safeguards will not be sufficient to protect vulnerable people. With a firm grasp on the arguments used to support assisted suicide, Andrew says:

DeVeber is Hiring Summer Interns !

Submission to Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights

The following submission was delivered to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights on Monday, May 3rd, 2016:
 
Bill C 14 on Medical Assistance in Dying Comment by Ian Gentles, Research Director, and Martha Crean, Co-President, deVeber Institute for Bioethics and Social Research 
 
Bill C14 is a significant improvement over the Parliamentary Committee’s recommendations in February. Given the recent experience at Attawapiskat the last thing we need is easier access to suicide for teenagers. In fact the Canadian Paediatric Society opposes the legalization of assisted dying for minors. Many psychologists and psychiatrists have spoken out against assisted dying for those suffering from mental illness such as depression.